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Yoga Journal

January/February 2019
Magazine

Yoga Journal offers all practitioners—from beginners to masters—expert information on how to live a healthier, happier, more fulfilling life both on and off the mat.

Begin Again

Finding Durga • This legendary goddess can help empower your aspirations and call forth the leader within.

Dance (Dance) Evolution • When executive editor Meghan Rabbitt found herself at an ecstatic dance class in Bali, she dropped all of her inhibitions—and it changed her yoga practice.

LET’S FLOW • These ’80s-inspired yoga clothes will pump up your practice.

Hear Me Roar • In her new book, How to Be Loved: A Memoir of Lifesaving Friendship, Eva Hagberg Fisher chronicles how, after five surgeries and a lifelong battle with her health, she unexpectedly found strength and healing through yoga, friendship, and physical and emotional support.

Space to Breathe • Celebrating five years of service, the nonprofit Exhale to Inhale brings free, trauma-informed yoga classes to rape crisis centers and domestic violence shelters in New York and California.

Energy Boost • Yoga teachers Tias and Surya Little, founders of Prajna Yoga in Santa Fe, New Mexico, share their favorite meal for supporting health and vitality.

learn from teacher Annie Carpenter • Wish you could jump inside the mind of a master teacher as she designs a sequence? Here, this teacher’s teacher gives us a look at how she created a SmartFLOW sequence to help you keep your hips free and your spine healthy—both on and off the mat.

Urdhva Mukha Paschimottanasana

Dancing with Gravity in Asana • An increased awareness of the effects of gravity can help you figure out which muscles to use and which to release in order to move more deeply and more safely into a pose.

this is what LEADERSHIP LOOKS LIKE • We need to talk about leadership in yoga. While discussions heat up about teaching standards, sexual misconduct, inclusivity, body positivity, the commercialization of the practice, and more, we’ve seen some old leaders fall, and at the same time, new champions have emerged. In light of all this, Yoga Journal set out to talk to some of today’s preeminent voices in Western yoga about leadership—what it looks like, how it has evolved (or devolved), and what the yoga community needs right now.

from student to teacher • Elena Brower and Amy Ippoliti first met when they were young yoga students studying to become teachers themselves. Now, they’re leading and mentoring the next generation of students and teachers. We caught up with the yoginis as they sat in Brower’s New York City living room to talk about lineage, mentorship, and what they agree is the key to strong leadership: studentship.

how to lead in challenging times • David Lipsius is the former CEO of Kripalu Center for Yoga and Health and the former president and CEO of Yoga Alliance—the default governing body of the yoga community. Lipsius accomplished much in his 18-month-long tenure at Yoga Alliance, including creating the Yoga Alliance Foundation, which brings yoga to underserved populations. Before leaving his post in order to be closer to his family, he also helped evolve the standards of yoga teacher training and created a policy on sexual misconduct. Here, Lipsius provides insight into his own leadership approach and his views on the continued need for self-reflection, personal responsibility, and cultural evolution within the yoga community.

READY, SET, LEAD!

BURNING DOWN THE HOUSE • Jessamyn Stanley is so over white-centric, consumer-driven yoga. Armed with a highly articulate voice, a powerful social platform, and a whole lot of attitude, this yoga teacher and New Age thought leader has declared to the world that anybody can practice yoga. And she’s not afraid to show us how it’s done.

FIND YOUR VOICE • Move beyond...


Expand title description text
Frequency: One time Pages: 110 Publisher: Pocket Outdoor Media, LLC Edition: January/February 2019

OverDrive Magazine

  • Release date: January 1, 2019

Formats

OverDrive Magazine

subjects

Health & Fitness

Languages

English

Yoga Journal offers all practitioners—from beginners to masters—expert information on how to live a healthier, happier, more fulfilling life both on and off the mat.

Begin Again

Finding Durga • This legendary goddess can help empower your aspirations and call forth the leader within.

Dance (Dance) Evolution • When executive editor Meghan Rabbitt found herself at an ecstatic dance class in Bali, she dropped all of her inhibitions—and it changed her yoga practice.

LET’S FLOW • These ’80s-inspired yoga clothes will pump up your practice.

Hear Me Roar • In her new book, How to Be Loved: A Memoir of Lifesaving Friendship, Eva Hagberg Fisher chronicles how, after five surgeries and a lifelong battle with her health, she unexpectedly found strength and healing through yoga, friendship, and physical and emotional support.

Space to Breathe • Celebrating five years of service, the nonprofit Exhale to Inhale brings free, trauma-informed yoga classes to rape crisis centers and domestic violence shelters in New York and California.

Energy Boost • Yoga teachers Tias and Surya Little, founders of Prajna Yoga in Santa Fe, New Mexico, share their favorite meal for supporting health and vitality.

learn from teacher Annie Carpenter • Wish you could jump inside the mind of a master teacher as she designs a sequence? Here, this teacher’s teacher gives us a look at how she created a SmartFLOW sequence to help you keep your hips free and your spine healthy—both on and off the mat.

Urdhva Mukha Paschimottanasana

Dancing with Gravity in Asana • An increased awareness of the effects of gravity can help you figure out which muscles to use and which to release in order to move more deeply and more safely into a pose.

this is what LEADERSHIP LOOKS LIKE • We need to talk about leadership in yoga. While discussions heat up about teaching standards, sexual misconduct, inclusivity, body positivity, the commercialization of the practice, and more, we’ve seen some old leaders fall, and at the same time, new champions have emerged. In light of all this, Yoga Journal set out to talk to some of today’s preeminent voices in Western yoga about leadership—what it looks like, how it has evolved (or devolved), and what the yoga community needs right now.

from student to teacher • Elena Brower and Amy Ippoliti first met when they were young yoga students studying to become teachers themselves. Now, they’re leading and mentoring the next generation of students and teachers. We caught up with the yoginis as they sat in Brower’s New York City living room to talk about lineage, mentorship, and what they agree is the key to strong leadership: studentship.

how to lead in challenging times • David Lipsius is the former CEO of Kripalu Center for Yoga and Health and the former president and CEO of Yoga Alliance—the default governing body of the yoga community. Lipsius accomplished much in his 18-month-long tenure at Yoga Alliance, including creating the Yoga Alliance Foundation, which brings yoga to underserved populations. Before leaving his post in order to be closer to his family, he also helped evolve the standards of yoga teacher training and created a policy on sexual misconduct. Here, Lipsius provides insight into his own leadership approach and his views on the continued need for self-reflection, personal responsibility, and cultural evolution within the yoga community.

READY, SET, LEAD!

BURNING DOWN THE HOUSE • Jessamyn Stanley is so over white-centric, consumer-driven yoga. Armed with a highly articulate voice, a powerful social platform, and a whole lot of attitude, this yoga teacher and New Age thought leader has declared to the world that anybody can practice yoga. And she’s not afraid to show us how it’s done.

FIND YOUR VOICE • Move beyond...


Expand title description text
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