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ChopChop Magazine

Spring 2021 - Issue 43
Magazine

ChopChop: The Fun Cooking Magazine for Families is an award-winning quarterly magazine, published in English and Spanish for over 10 years. Each 48-page issue of the magazine contains delicious, nutritious, culturally diverse, affordable, and easy-to-follow recipes, along with essential kitchen skills, STEAM learning, and loads of fun games, and activities.

QUICK BITES

THE LEARNING GUIDE TO THIS ISSUE

ChopChop Jr.: Celery Sticks with Cottage Cheese • RECIPES JUST RIGHT FOR THE LITTLEST COOKS

Cornmeal Griddle Cakes • These tasty little cakes are crispy on the outside and creamy on the inside—like a cross between grits and pancakes. And you can serve them sweet or savory (see our tips below).

KITCHEN CASH • MATH AND FINANCE IN COOKING

CARTOON CORNER

GRAEAT GRAINS • We love whole grains: they’re nutty-tasting, inexpensive, satisfying, and full of nutrients. Plus, once you get the hang of it, they’re really easy to cook. How do we like to eat them? Turn the page to find out!

DO IT YOURSELF GRAIN BOWLS

How To: Cook Whole Grains • Whole grains are delicious and nutty-tasting, super-versatile, and better for you than refined grains, like white rice, since they’re full of vitamins, minerals, and fiber. We boil them in lots of water and then drain them—the same way we cook pasta. Once you get the hang of it, you’ll find that it’s really pretty easy. Use cooked grains in DIY Grain Bowls (page 14), as a breakfast or side dish, or as a base for stew, soup, or chili.

Perfect Polenta • Polenta is an Italian style of cooked cornmeal, and it’s basically the same as grits, which is a traditional dish of the American South (also sometimes known as cornmeal mush). It’s delicious if you eat it like oatmeal, but it’s also a good base for a DIY Grain Bowl (page 14) or topped with stew or a stir-fry. Polenta is traditionally cooked by stirring it forever on the stovetop, but our oven-baked method is much easier.

Quinoa Tabouli • Tabouli (pronounced tuh-BOO-lee) is a Middle Eastern grain salad traditionally made from cracked wheat (also called bulgur). Here, we’re using quinoa—which is the protein-rich seed of a plant in the grass family—because we like its texture and flavor, but feel free to use 2 cups of any cooked grains you like.

Nutty Oat Bars • This is one of our favorite snacks: totally satisfying and so much better than storebought. You can use any mixture of nuts, seeds, and dried fruit you like: almonds, walnuts, pecans, or peanuts; sunflower or pumpkin seeds; dates, raisins, or dried cherries or cranberries. Our Kids Advisory Board recipe tester Siddharth rolled the mixture into balls instead of pressing it out and cutting it into bars, and it worked great!

Vegetable Barley Soup • This is a comforting favorite—perfect for the last chilly evenings of winter, or to put in your thermos for lunch. The barley is chewy, delicious, and completely satisfying. Escarole is a ruffly, bitter green that turns sweet when you cook it; if you can’t find it or don’t like it, use a green you prefer (see “or else” below).

WHAT’S DIFFERENT?

Pack a Picnic

SCRUMPTIOUS WORD SEARCH

ALL ABOUT GREENS • Greens means different shades of green—in a box of crayons, say, or a set of paints. But it also refers to all the leafy vegetables you eat: the kind you eat raw, like lettuce, arugula, and other salad greens, and the kind you might cook, like chard, spinach, collards, kale, and cabbage. Whatever you choose, we’ve got lots of ideas for how to prepare, cook, and enjoy them. It’s our favorite color for a reason.

Cheesy Green Omelet • An omelet (pronounced AHM-lit) is a French dish like scrambled eggs that you turn into a fancy, folded pancake. It can be a little tricky, but hey—don’t worry! If it’s not going well, just use your spatula to scramble...


Expand title description text
Frequency: Quarterly Pages: 48 Publisher: ChopChop Family Edition: Spring 2021 - Issue 43

OverDrive Magazine

  • Release date: February 25, 2021

Formats

OverDrive Magazine

Languages

English

ChopChop: The Fun Cooking Magazine for Families is an award-winning quarterly magazine, published in English and Spanish for over 10 years. Each 48-page issue of the magazine contains delicious, nutritious, culturally diverse, affordable, and easy-to-follow recipes, along with essential kitchen skills, STEAM learning, and loads of fun games, and activities.

QUICK BITES

THE LEARNING GUIDE TO THIS ISSUE

ChopChop Jr.: Celery Sticks with Cottage Cheese • RECIPES JUST RIGHT FOR THE LITTLEST COOKS

Cornmeal Griddle Cakes • These tasty little cakes are crispy on the outside and creamy on the inside—like a cross between grits and pancakes. And you can serve them sweet or savory (see our tips below).

KITCHEN CASH • MATH AND FINANCE IN COOKING

CARTOON CORNER

GRAEAT GRAINS • We love whole grains: they’re nutty-tasting, inexpensive, satisfying, and full of nutrients. Plus, once you get the hang of it, they’re really easy to cook. How do we like to eat them? Turn the page to find out!

DO IT YOURSELF GRAIN BOWLS

How To: Cook Whole Grains • Whole grains are delicious and nutty-tasting, super-versatile, and better for you than refined grains, like white rice, since they’re full of vitamins, minerals, and fiber. We boil them in lots of water and then drain them—the same way we cook pasta. Once you get the hang of it, you’ll find that it’s really pretty easy. Use cooked grains in DIY Grain Bowls (page 14), as a breakfast or side dish, or as a base for stew, soup, or chili.

Perfect Polenta • Polenta is an Italian style of cooked cornmeal, and it’s basically the same as grits, which is a traditional dish of the American South (also sometimes known as cornmeal mush). It’s delicious if you eat it like oatmeal, but it’s also a good base for a DIY Grain Bowl (page 14) or topped with stew or a stir-fry. Polenta is traditionally cooked by stirring it forever on the stovetop, but our oven-baked method is much easier.

Quinoa Tabouli • Tabouli (pronounced tuh-BOO-lee) is a Middle Eastern grain salad traditionally made from cracked wheat (also called bulgur). Here, we’re using quinoa—which is the protein-rich seed of a plant in the grass family—because we like its texture and flavor, but feel free to use 2 cups of any cooked grains you like.

Nutty Oat Bars • This is one of our favorite snacks: totally satisfying and so much better than storebought. You can use any mixture of nuts, seeds, and dried fruit you like: almonds, walnuts, pecans, or peanuts; sunflower or pumpkin seeds; dates, raisins, or dried cherries or cranberries. Our Kids Advisory Board recipe tester Siddharth rolled the mixture into balls instead of pressing it out and cutting it into bars, and it worked great!

Vegetable Barley Soup • This is a comforting favorite—perfect for the last chilly evenings of winter, or to put in your thermos for lunch. The barley is chewy, delicious, and completely satisfying. Escarole is a ruffly, bitter green that turns sweet when you cook it; if you can’t find it or don’t like it, use a green you prefer (see “or else” below).

WHAT’S DIFFERENT?

Pack a Picnic

SCRUMPTIOUS WORD SEARCH

ALL ABOUT GREENS • Greens means different shades of green—in a box of crayons, say, or a set of paints. But it also refers to all the leafy vegetables you eat: the kind you eat raw, like lettuce, arugula, and other salad greens, and the kind you might cook, like chard, spinach, collards, kale, and cabbage. Whatever you choose, we’ve got lots of ideas for how to prepare, cook, and enjoy them. It’s our favorite color for a reason.

Cheesy Green Omelet • An omelet (pronounced AHM-lit) is a French dish like scrambled eggs that you turn into a fancy, folded pancake. It can be a little tricky, but hey—don’t worry! If it’s not going well, just use your spatula to scramble...


Expand title description text
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